Aggressive Shark At Tunnels

Terry Lilly got a beautiful picture and a bit of a scare spearfishing at Tunnels recently. After spearing a fish, a Galapagos shark charged in and stole it. Lilly says the 10-foot shark was one of the most aggressive he’s encountered, even following him toward the shore. In 3 feet of water, the shark’s fin protruded above the surface, causing some screaming among beach-goers …

http://www.midweekkauai.com

 

 

Spearfisherman encounters tiger shark off of Hawaii

Spearfishing at Police Beach til the grey ninja bully showed up.
this happened at 11:30 sat 6-9-12 about 150 yards offshore in 10-12 feet of water

spearfishing at Police Beach til the grey ninja bully showed up. this happened at 11:30 sat 6-9-12 about 150 yards offshore in 10-12 feet of water

spearfishing at Police Beach til the grey ninja bully showed up.
this happened at 11:30 sat 6-9-12 about 150 yards offshore in 10-12 feet of water

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British tourist pulls shark away from Australia beach

Paul Marshallsea wrestled with the 6ft fish when it swam towards beachgoers on Bulcock Beach on Australia’s Queensland coast.

Paul Marshallsea wrestled with the 6ft fish when it swam towards beachgoers on Bulcock Beach on Australia’s Queensland coast.

 

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Video uploaded by IBTimesUK on 21. January 2013 : A British holidaymaker grappled with a shark in shallow waters off a busy beach as children frolicked in the sea. Paul Marshallsea wrestled with the 6ft fish when it swam towards beachgoers on Bulcock Beach on Australia’s Queensland coast. The 62-year-old went into action when an alarm rang that a shark was in the water. Marshallsea, a grandfather, told WalesOnline: “We got hold of his tail and pulled with all our might to get the shark back into deep enough water so that the poor thing could survive. “While I was pulling the shark by the tail back into deeper water her 2ft-long babies were swimming through my legs. They must have got lost and marooned by the shallow sandbanks and got beached. “But the trouble was when we got the shark to just over knee deep it then turned on us and just missed me with a bite which was a fraction away from my leg. Written by Dominic Gover –

 

 

Bull shark gets into swimming enclosure

A LARGE shark managed to get into a swimming enclosure near a popular picnic spot on Macleay Island, off the southeast Queensland coast.

 A LARGE shark managed to get into a swimming enclosure near a popular picnic spot on Macleay Island, off the southeast Queensland coast.

A LARGE shark managed to get into a swimming enclosure near a popular picnic spot on Macleay Island, off the southeast Queensland coast.

Police were alerted to the bull shark in the swimming area, which is surrounded by a net, at Macleay Island in Moreton Bay about 7.30am (AEST) on Saturday.

The shark stayed in the enclosure near the picnic spot Pats Park for some time before swimming out about 11am (AEST), according to police on the island.

“The shark net there isn’t real flash. It doesn’t quite go down to the sea bed so anything can slide in underneath,” Sergeant Dave McDougall told AAP.

He said it was the first time he heard of a shark swimming into the section.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/

 

 

 

Thousands of sharks share South Florida’s surf

Florida Atlantic University Associate Professor Stephen Kajiura conducts aerial surveys of migrating sharks along south Florida beaches.

By David Fleshler, Sun Sentinel2:46 p.m. EST, January 18, 2013

Sharks along Florida East Coast

Sharks along Florida East Coast

 

The sharks stream in the thousands up South Florida’s coast, a sight that might terrify the people playing in the surf less than a football field away.

From a Cessna 172 flying slowly along the beach, Stephen Kajiura videotapes this procession of oceanic predators as they engage in their annual migration from North Carolina.

Kajiura, an associate professor of biology at Florida Atlantic University, is conducting the first systematic study of the migrations of blacktip sharks, a pattern that has led lifeguards to close beaches and may be linked to increases in shark bites.

“Every year we see the same thing, large numbers of sharks off South Florida,” he said. “We’ve got this really strong, seasonal influx of sharks. They spend the winter here and go up north again. We’ve known about the phenomenon for years, but no one’s ever studied it.”

The migrations run from roughly Cape Hatteras, N.C., to Broward County, or possibly northern Miami-Dade County, Kajiura said. The sharks start arriving in December, with numbers peaking in January and February before tapering off. By April, very few are left in South Florida. They’re following their prey, largely schools of mullet.

Since February of 2011, Kajiura or a friend has piloted the Cessna every two weeks on a route from Boca Raton to Jupiter Inlet with a video camera mounted on the plane. Back at the office, he analyzes the tapes, counting the sharks and noting their locations.

The numbers are shocking. On the strip of ocean he studies, running from shore to about two football fields out, he has counted 15,000 sharks on a single trip.

“That’s a huge number of sharks,” he said. “They are very close to shore. They’re sometimes right in the surf area. Sometimes 30 feet from shore….If you’re sitting in the water you have an average of one shark within 60 feet of you.”

The sharks are primarily blacktips, which reach a maximum length of about six feet, big enough to be dangerous.

They account for 20 percent of the unprovoked shark attacks in Florida, tying with bull sharks as the species responsible for the most attacks, according to the International Shark Attack File at the Florida Museum of Natural History. There were 11 unprovoked shark attacks in 2011 in Florida, the lowest number since 1993.

Blacktip attacks tend to be cases of mistaken identity, when murky water allows a shark to mistake a hand or foot for a fish. Such attacks typically take place off Central and Northern Florida, where the water is murkier and the possibility of errors easier. South Florida’s water is pretty clear, so the danger of an encounter with a confused blacktip is much less, Kajiura said.

“I don’t want to cause panic,” Kajiura said. “There’s a lot of sharks out there, but the probability of being bitten is very small.”

Blacktip attacks are rarely if ever fatal – although certainty is impossible because the species in shark attacks isn’t always known. The “big three” for killing people are the great white, tiger and bull shark, all of which can be found in Florida waters. These species tend not to travel in schools like blacktips, although they have come close enough to shore to attack swimmers.

The last fatal attack in South Florida took place in 2010, when an eight or nine foot bull or tiger shark killed a kiteboarder off Stuart.

Kajiura plans to submit his results for publication this year. Following that, if he can obtain the funding, he plans to fit sharks with transmitters so he can find out how far individual sharks travel and do a deeper study of their life histories.

 

Blacktip shark

Habitat: Found worldwide. Inhabit bays, lagoons, coastal waters

Food: fish, small sharks, rays, squid, crabs, octopus, lobster

Behavior: A fast swimmer, can be seen jumping out of the water.

Size: up to 6 feet

Commercial value: Caught for meat and fins.

Conservation status: Listed as “near threatened” by International Union for Conservation of Nature due to popularity as a food fish.

Source: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/

Great white shark off Jacksonville Beach

 Great white shark was ‘in the surf break off Jacksonville Beach’

Location of  Mary Lee a Great White Shark

Location of Mary Lee a Great White Shark

 

OCEARCH.org-Captain Brett McBride climbs into the shark lift with Mary Lee, a shark that has been tracked off the First Coast's shores the week of Jan. 8. The great white weighs in at 3,456 pounds is 16½ feet long.

OCEARCH.org-Captain Brett McBride climbs into the shark lift with Mary Lee, a shark that has been tracked off the First Coast’s shores the week of Jan. 8. The great white weighs in at 3,456 pounds is 16½ feet long.

 

A Facebook star named Mary Lee — a giant great white shark whose wanderings are tracked by GPS — apparently made an extremely close and personal visit to Jacksonville Beach in the early hours of Tuesday morning.

Ocearch, a shark research group, made this posting on its Facebook page at about that time: “Jacksonville Beach, FL residents and beach users please read. Mary Lee is a 16 1/2 ft, 3,500lbs mature female white shark. Her most recent position is off 6th Ave S and 1st St. S in the surf break off Jacksonville Beach, FL.’”

That will get your attention.

Ocearch founding chairman Chris Fischer was going to bed in Park City, Utah, when an email alert showed him the location of Mary Lee. His group, a nonprofit dedicated to shark preservation, had caught and tagged the giant shark off Massachusetts in September. It had been moving steadily south since then, moving near shore and away, again and again.

Now it had moved really, really close to shore.

“It looked like it was practically in a parking lot in Jacksonville Beach,” he said.

So at 12:46 a.m., Fischer called Jacksonville Beach police — just to let them know. Sgt. Tommy Crumley, the agency’s public information officer, said police took the information seriously. An officer stopped by the lifeguard station in the middle of the night to alert lifeguards there, and police checked the beach to make sure nobody was swimming.

On a cold winter’s night, no one was.

Even so, on Thursday morning, the department sent out a news release saying, “Due to the size of the shark and the potential dangers we are recommending at this time that people stay out of the water until the shark leaves our area.”

The meanderings of Mary Lee have made the shark something of an internet sensation on Ocearch’s Facebook page, which Tuesday afternoon had more than 26,000 “likes” — more than 1,000 over what it had that morning.

A few hours after its first Facebook notice about Mary Lee in the Jacksonville Beach surf, Ocearch posted some slightly more reassuring news: “Mary Lee moves slightly N and a little more offshore. She is off Neptune Beach FL near Jacksonville.”

Later Tuesday morning came more good news: “As of 7:49am EST Mary Lee has moved east, away from the beach.”

And on that path? It takes her closer to another great white named Genie, who’s hanging around farther off the coast of Jacksonville. When an Ocearch vessel captured and tagged Genie, it was 14 feet, 8 inches long and weighed 2,292 pounds, a puny thing compared to Mary Lee.

Ocearch’s website has a “Global Shark Tracker system” page where people can find tagged sharks around the world. Fischer said he hopes that helps scientist research and protect the endangered animals.

He also wants to raise public awareness, while letting people in on what he called a “400 million-year-old mystery” — the location of the ocean’s top predators.

“I’m hoping for less fear and more enlightenment,” he said. “Mary Lee and other great white sharks like this have been making this migration for hundreds of millions of years. These sharks have been swimming up and down your beaches for a long time, and now we know where they are. People are excited to know that Mary Lee is in the neighborhood, doing her great white shark thing.”

Rob Emahiser, a lieutenant in the Jacksonville Beach Ocean Rescue corps, said lifeguards had not barred swimmers and surfers from the water, since Mary Lee had tracked offshore by early Thursday.

“There’s not enough reason to create hysteria and close the water for a shark that’s offshore,” he said.

Lifeguards will keep an eye out on the website with Mary Lee’s wanderings, Emahiser said. But the information is of limited use, he notes: “We’ll use it. But it really is only useful for the sharks that are tagged.”

George Burgess, a shark expert at the University of Florida, said there’s no doubt Mary Lee has “many colleagues” who remain untagged — though no one knows how many.

He is skeptical of the accuracy of GPS locating, saying readings can be off by a considerable distance. But it’s well known that great whites migrate south in the winter, congregating in the cool — but not cold — water that they like, off the Georgia and North Florida Coast. They’re most likely following right whales, a favored food, he said.

They’re not so interested, however, in humans, said Burgess, who’s director of the International Shark Attack File at the Florida Museum of Natural History. He said there has not been a single documented instance in Florida’s recorded history of a great white attacking a human being.

Still, reports of a 3,500-pound shark in the surf will no doubt make many a little more nervous .

Robbie Wannenburg, 21, of Atlantic Beach went surfing at the Jacksonville Beach pier from 7:30 to 10 a.m. Tuesday. Only later did he learn of Mary Lee’s visit to the area.

“I guess I feel pretty lucky, considering it didn’t eat me,” he said. “I was looking at the tracking map later and, well, it’s 12 miles off shore, I might go surfing again.”

That did not happen.

“But my mom said no,” Wannenburg said. “I guess it is pretty scary, right?”

http://jacksonville.com/