Shark Attack On Florida’s Akaloosa Island: Details Emerge Of 39-Year-Old Swimmer’s Ordeal
Shark Attack On Florida Island
The shark attack of an unidentified man on Florida’s Akaloosa Island is updated with details surrounding the event. As Inquisitr just reported, a man vacationing from Tennessee was bit on the foot by a shark Monday. More information on the attack are revealed in this article.

According to NFW Daily News, the man’s name is Terrell Moore from Pleasant View. Monday’s report initially stated that he had lacerations on his foot requiring stitches, and that he was fishing at the time of the attack. The latest report indicates Moore was with his wife and their 11-year-old son swimming about 75 yards from shore when he stopped at the sandbar. He suffered a broken foot and two deep puncture wounds while swimming. His wife, Melissa, tells the news source:

“He got on the second sandbar and was kind of standing up. All of the sudden, he went under a little bit and popped back up… he started swimming really fast.”

First responders believed Moore was bait-fishing with the two other fishermen seen at the sandbar. What had actually happened was he was seen standing near them, about 15-feet from where the family was swimming.

As a side note, NBC Los Angeles reports that a fishing ban on Mahattan Beach pier is being debated after a shark that was caught on a fishing line attacked a swimmer there on July 5.

George Burgess, curator of the International Shark Attack File, says:

“The fishermen are very attractive to sharks. Fishermen and bathers and surfers don’t mix.”

Burgess surmises:

“… Misinterpreting the moves of (Moore’s) foot for being the actions of a fish, possibly even a hooked fish.”

Burgess says this isn’t unusual:

“It’s your typical hit and run attack – grabs a human and then lets go. No Jaws music in the background.”

Moore recounts the shark as being about the size of his son. Burgess estimates from the bite that the shark was somewhat small — theorizing that it might have been from a backtip or spinner shark. Both are common species that feed off fish along Panhandle waters inland. He thinks a “tug of war” between the shark and Moore exasperated the situation.

“If you’re rotating your ankle around something that’s holding it, you can break some bones. If he hadn’t broken his foot, he might have gotten a stitch or two on his lacerations, and a good bar story.”

Moore’s wife is grateful his shark attack wasn’t worse.

“We’re happy everyone’s here and everyone’s safe.”

The family will finish out their vacation before heading home. On Tuesday, Moore was experiencing a lot of pain and is currently on crutches. Despite his shark attack, Moore knows there’s a risk to some degree going into areas where sharks lurk. He concludes:

“We’re going to stick it out. What are you going to do? You make the best of it.

“It happens, we’re in their territory. We understand that.”

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